Latin American Coffee Recipes To Enjoy This Fall and Beyond | Sueños Coffee Co.
As we close out Hispanic/Latinx Heritage Month, here are a few recipes you can easily make at home to experience and appreciate how coffee is enjoyed across different areas of Latin America and the Caribbean. 

 

 Most of these recipes are best using coffee brewed with a Greca (Moka Pot) or as espresso in an espresso machine. However, if these methods are not easily available to you, you can use any brew method in your arsenal. 

Café de Olla

Café de Olla translates to "pot coffee" and is a Mexican coffee recipe that is traditionally made in a clay or enamel pot. While the recipe is simple, the taste and smell is beautifully comforting. 

In a pot, add 2 cups of water, .5 or 1 cinnamon stick, and 1/4 cup of Piloncillo (or dark brown sugar) and bring to a boil. Once the water boils, add 2 heaping tbsp of coffee, turn off the heat, cover and let sit for 5 min. Pour through a strainer and serve. Makes 2 cups. 

Café de Olla is best without milk. 

Cuban Cortadito

The Cuban version of the Cortado (and personally, my preferred version). It is a sweetened version and is traditionally made using a Moka Pot. 

There are 3 different ways to make a Cortadito, and I'm sure arguments can be made about which method is the most "traditional." Each method uses a 1:1 espresso to milk ratio.

Method 1:  

Before brewing, add 2 tsps of sugar to the top of the Moka Pot and allow the coffee to be sweetened during brewing. Serve in a small cup and whip for a few seconds to create the espuma (froth) and then top with steamed milk. 

Method 2:

Brew your coffee with the Moka Pot. Add 2 tsps of sugar to your cup. Pour just enough espresso to cover the sugar and whisk it quickly for a few seconds to create the espuma. Add the remaining espresso and top it off with steamed milk. 

Method 3:

Brew your coffee with Moka Pot. Serve in a small cup and add sweetened condensed milk. 

Café con Leche

Café con Leche brings up so many memories. It is what I enjoyed sitting around the dining table, listening to my grandmother's stories of Puerto Rico. 

To make this, brew your coffee using a Moka Pot, coffee sock, or your preferred method. In a pot, bring milk to just below a boil (it should be scalding), and add sugar (to your liking) and stir. Turn off the heat, and fold in the coffee, give a quick stir, and then serve. 

The main difference between this and a Latte is that Café con Leche uses slightly less milk. 

Tinto

Tinto can be found in many homes in Colombia. It is a recipe that combines coffee and agua de panela, a popular sugar cane drink. 

Make your agua de panela first. In a pot, add water and panela (unrefined cane sugar) and bring to a boil. Once it boils, reduce the heat and let it simmer for about 30 minutes. 

Brew your coffee using your preferred method. Serve the coffee, and add some agua de panela. Serve hot. If needed, you can add a splash of milk, but it is usually enjoyed black.

Agua de panela can also be enjoyed on its own or with lime to help cold/flu symptoms.

The commonality of each of these recipes is that they are steeped in culture, love, family, and community. Coffee is meant to be an experience, and we hope that one or each of these, can provide that for you.